Donald Trump’s Trial Balloons Are Catching Up With Him

bobi
Nga bobi April 10, 2016 11:14

Donald Trump’s Trial Balloons Are Catching Up With Him

10TRUMP-master675

WASHINGTON — Two weeks ago, Donald J. Trump said he could livewith a nuclear-armed Japan and South Korea if it meant they could defend themselves against North Korea without American aid. “I’m not sure that would be a bad thing for us,” he said.

Since then he has changed his tune. After Japanese and South Korean officials raised fears of an Asian arms race, and President Obama ridiculed his remark, Mr. Trump began to say he did not actually want the two countries to obtain nuclear weapons — but that, because of American weakness, “at some point it could happen anyway.”

It was not the first time Mr. Trump has hastily added deflating caveats to his headline-grabbing trial balloons.

In a debate a month ago, he declared himself in favor of torture if it would extract information from terrorists, then issued a statement saying he would respect the law, then followed it up by saying that the law must be changed.

In a television interview on March 30, he suggested that women who have illegal abortions should face “some form of punishment,” then reversed himself in another carefully worded statement, then suggested in an interview that abortion should remain legal, then effectively clicked “undo” with another written statement.

In each case, Mr. Trump appeared to be seeNone of this seemed to matter much until recently. But the Trump style — long on gut instincts, short on briefing books — has taken a toll. His opponents have called him reckless and unfit to be commander in chief. Mr. Obama has said Mr. Trump “doesn’t know much about foreign policy, or nuclear policy, or the Korean Peninsula, or the world generally.”

 

Mr. Trump did not respond to repeated requests to speak with him. His aides say that he is continuing to build out a policy team and will soon give speeches.

During the Nuclear Security Summit meeting a little more than a week ago, Mr. Obama, twisting the knife, said that foreign leaders had taken him aside to ask if Mr. Trump was really serious about pulling back from longtime alliances or effectively bidding them out.

Indeed, several foreign leaders visiting Washington for the summit meeting peppered administration officials and journalists with questions about what Mr. Trump would actually do as president. All the leaders declined to go on the record, saying that if he were elected they would have to deal with him.

But Mr. Trump’s rhetorical journey on letting Japan and South Korea build their own arsenals was instructive.

He first suggested that he was open to arming the two nations during an interview with The New York Times. He also began saying that he would pull out of NATO if European members did not pay a greater share of its costs. “If it breaks up NATO, it breaks up NATO,” he said at a rally in Racine, Wis.

As Japanese and South Korean officials objected to his comments, Mr. Trump may have begun to recognize that the idea of letting the two countries defend themselves against North Korean threats flew in the face of another of his stated goals: avoiding proliferation. Arms control experts pointed out that if Tokyo and Seoul sought nuclear weapons, they would violate their commitments under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

What made Mr. Trump’s statement

 

bobi
Nga bobi April 10, 2016 11:14
Write a comment

No Comments

No Comments Yet!

Let me tell You a sad story ! There are no comments yet, but You can be first one to comment this article.

Write a comment
View comments

Write a comment

Your e-mail address will not be published.
Required fields are marked*